Hetty Startup, public historian

working to enrich place-based learning


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Removing the Winnicut River Dam

Sustaining Piscataqua

Written by Erin Kenney

Greenland, New Hampshire is home to the Winnicut River.  This river served as a highway and popular camping spot for the Native Americans.   The River is part of the Great Bay, which is located ten miles inland and encompasses nearly 25,000 acres of tidal waters.   Part of the Picataqua region, the Great Bay is a tidal estuary that including several flowing rivers creating a boundary between New Hampshire and Maine.  It empties into the Atlantic Ocean east of Portsmouth.

Over many years, the Picataqua River made the shift from maritime to marine. Being that we no longer depend on these waterways in the Picataqua region for commerce, people are starting to think of these places in terms of sustainability. The Winnicut River was a highway to travelers, supplying transportation, food, as well as natural beauty. The amount of contamination in the river has opened the…

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Spring mysteries: Botticelli’s Primavera

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The Artstor Blog

Sandro Botticelli | Primavera; Allegory of Spring | c. 1478 | Galleria degli Uffizi | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com;  scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Sandro Botticelli | Primavera; Allegory of Spring | c. 1478 | Galleria degli Uffizi | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Spring is here! The return of sunshine inspired us to look at Botticelli’s Primavera, a masterpiece of the early Renaissance and arguably the most popular artistic representation of the season, even if – as we shall see – its interpretation remains inconclusive.

Botticelli painted Primavera sometime between 1477 and 1482, probably for the marriage of Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco, cousin of the powerful Italian statesman (and important patron of the arts) Lorenzo Medici. The date is just one of the many facts surrounding the painting that remain unclear. For starters, its original title is unknown; it was first called La Primavera by the artist/art historian Giorgio Vasari, who only saw it some 70 years after it…

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